Monday, 18 June 2018

25th Anniversary of the Osteopaths Act

The General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) was established by the Osteopaths Act 1993 to ‘provide for the regulation of the profession of osteopathy’.

Maintaining standards

The Osteopathic Practice Standards sets out the standards that practising osteopaths must meet. These include knowledge of the safe and competent practice of osteopathy, professional ethics and after-care evaluation.
The practice of osteopathy has a long history in the United Kingdom. The first school of osteopathy was established in London in 1917 by John Martin Littlejohn a pupil of A.T. Still, who had been Dean of The Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine. After many years of existing outside the mainstream of health care provision, the osteopathic profession in the UK was accorded formal recognition by Parliament in 1993 by the Osteopaths Act.This legislation now provides the profession of osteopathy the same legal framework of statutory self-regulation as other healthcare professions such as medicine and dentistry.
This Act provides for "protection of title" A person who, whether expressly or implicitly describes him - or her- self as an osteopath, osteopathic practitioner, osteopathic physician, osteopathist, osteotherapist, or any kind of osteopath is guilty of an offence unless they are registered as an osteopath. There are currently more than five thousand osteopaths registered in the UK.
Osteopathic medicine is regulated by the General Osteopathic Council, (GOsC) under the terms of the Osteopaths Act 1993 and statement from the GMC. Practising osteopaths will usually have a B.S. or M.Sc. in osteopathy. 
Osteopathy is a way of detecting, treating and preventing health problems by moving, stretching and massaging a person's muscles and joints.
Osteopathy is based on the principle that the wellbeing of an individual depends on their bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together. Osteopaths use physical manipulation, stretching and massage with the aim of: increasing the mobility of joints, relieving muscle tension, enhancing the blood supply to tissues and helping the body to heal.
If you have any questions you would like to ask about Osteopathy or would like to know if Osteopathy could help you, give us a call and we'll also give you a FREE 15 minute Osteopathic back and health assessment check 01270 629933 or email info@weaverhouse.com 

Monday, 4 June 2018

Why not try something new....

This week for National Mens Health week we are encouraging men to try something new and investigate better ways to prevent and manage sports injuries, occupational injuries or any other niggling muscle or joint pains they may have. 


Now that we have your attention....
When you think of Osteopathy, do you immediately think of bones? We treat more than you think.
We are primary healthcare practitioners who can help identify important types of dysfunction in your body. We focus on how your skeleton, joints, muscles, nerves and circulation work together to improve your health and well-being.
Osteopathic treatment covers a diverse range of techniques such as stretching and soft tissue massage for general treatment of muscles, tendons and ligaments; along with exercise prescription and mobilisation of specific joints and soft tissues.
Common conditions that men seek help from their osteopath for include neck pain, sports injuries, headaches and migraines, whiplash, postural problems, sciatica, knee and heel pain, shin splints, arthritis and occupational injuries.
In Men's Health Week, now is the perfect time to find out more about how osteopathy can help you – and you don’t need a referral.
Want to find out what osteopathy can do for you? Make an appointment today 01270 629933 

Sunday, 3 June 2018

Prevention is the best cure

It’s important that all patients diagnosed with diabetes see a podiatrist for preventative foot-care. Diabetics are more at risk of foot problems because of the following potential complications with diabetes:

Damage to the nerves in the feet (neuropathy)
Neuropathy can result from poor blood glucose control and damage to the nerves in your feet. This causes a loss of protective sensation meaning your feet may be unable to detect injury. For example, you may not be aware of an ulcer on the bottom of your foot as you do not feel any pain. This can then lead to more serious foot complications like infection if not treated. Symptoms of neuropathy can include numbness, tingling, pins and needles or a burning sensation in the feet.

Damage to the blood vessels that supply the feet
Poor blood glucose control may also cause a reduction in the blood supply to the feet. Poor circulation delays healing and makes people with diabetes more susceptible to infection following any cut or wound to the foot.
Symptoms of poor blood supply may include cold feet, cramps and pain.

People who suffer from diabetes should see a podiatrist as soon as they are diagnosed. An initial diabetes foot check will help determine how often you should visit a podiatrist for diabetic foot care and prevention of any related problems. 
Remember your feet are more at risk with diabetes and prevention is the best cure. 

As well as diabetic foot care our podiatrist also treats general foot problems, children’s foot problems and sports injuries. Call us today to make an appointment 01270 629933 

Tuesday, 15 May 2018

Changes during pregnancy

During pregnancy, a woman’s body undergoes huge changes to accommodate the growing foetus. 
Apart from the obvious physical changes like expansion of the abdominal region, hormonal releases can affect the function of your body's internal systems. 
As your pregnancy progresses, the extra weight creates a shift in your body's centre of gravity. Your supporting ligaments also soften. These factors along with how you use your body day to day may add stress to your body, causing problems like back pain, sciatica, shortness of breath, swelling, high blood pressure and fatigue. 
One of the most rewarding aspects of being an Osteopath is the opportunity to help a pregnant lady in discomfort, and to assist her throughout the pregnancy.
We can help to alleviate some of the discomfort caused by weight gain and postural adaptations, using gentle and safe techniques to support Mum and baby. 
We can also offer advice about managing these symptoms and demonstrate self-help techniques which you and your birthing partner can use during pregnancy and labour.
Give us a call today 01270 629933 to make an appointment or email us info@weaverhouse.com 

Monday, 7 May 2018

Fibromyalgia and M.E./Chronic Fatigue

Fibromyalgia and M.E/Chronic Fatigue can be a very difficult illness to manage and treat. Accompanied by numerous symptoms, ranging from fatigue to debilitating muscle pain, sufferers often have to look for a number of different treatments before they experience any relief.

Not all of these symptoms will apply to everyone. 
Common signs and symptoms include:

Widespread Pain
Morning Stiffness
Fatigue

Nausea
Sleep Disorders
Urinary and Pelvic Problems
Dizziness
Chronic Headaches
Cold Symptoms
Temporomandibular Joint
Dysfunction Syndrome
Multiple Chemical
Sensitivity Syndromes
"Fibro fog": Cognitive
or Memory Impairment
Skin Complaints
Chest Symptoms
Anxiety
Depression
Dysmenorrhea
Aggravating Factors
Myofascial Pain
Syndrome
Muscle Twitches
and Weakness
Memory Loss
Weight Gain
Vision problems
Poor body temperature control 


Could Osteopathy help?                                                                                            

Osteopathy can help to ease many symptoms, particularly fatigue, muscle pain, and chronic headaches. It can also help to:

·      increase flexibility
·      improve range of motion
·      relieve joint pain


Osteopaths can be very helpful when it comes to diagnosing fibromyalgia syndrome/M.E/Chronic Fatigue 
Because of the hands-on treatment techniques, we can easily identify tender points around the body, as well as other signs.

For further information please give us a call 01270 629933 or email info@weaverhouse.comWe can also offer you a FREE 15-minute Osteopathic back and health assessment check. 



Meet Molly the Mole

Nice to meet you! 
Skin cancer can come at any time so it's important to remember to check your moles regularly. 
I don't mean moles like Molly, but the ones on your body. 
Most skin cancers can be cured if they are detected early, so here are my top tips for checking your skin:
1. Check your skin regularly for changes to moles or a patch of skin.

2. Ask a friend or family member to check areas you can't see easily such as ears, scalp and back.

3. Look out for moles or patches of skin that are growing, changing shape, developing new colours, inflamed, bleeding, crusting, red around the edges, itchy or behaving unusally.

4. If in doubt get it checked by your GP or dermatologist. 

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the UK, and rates continue to rise.

At least 100,000 new cases are now diagnosed each year, and the disease kills over 2,500 people each year in the UK - that's seven people every day.
Whilst we are getting better at understanding how skin cancer works, we still have a long way to go. On average, someone who dies from skin cancer typically loses 20 years of their life, and rates of malignant melanoma are rising faster than any other type of common cancer.
UV exposure is the main preventable cause of skin cancer, so here are a few tips on how to stay safe when out in the sun:
Clothing 
Clothing should always be your first line of defence against damage from the sun, with sunscreen being used in addition to clothes, including a hat, t-shirt and UV protective sunglasses.

Find the right sunscreen
Use a sunscreen of SPF30 (SPF stands for ‘Sun Protection Factor’) and refers to the level of protection against UVB radiation, linked to skin cancer. Look for a four or ideally five-star UVA rating on the bottle which will help protect from UVA radiation, associated with skin ageing. You may also find that the UVA rating is represented by the letters ‘UVA’ inside a circle. Keep babies and toddlers should be kept out of direct sunlight.

Get your timing right
Skin needs time to absorb sunscreen, so apply generously about 20 to 30 minutes before going out. Re-apply frequently at least every two hours, as it can come off when sweating or through rubbing.

Seek shelter!
The sun tends to be strongest in the middle of the day, so find some shade typically between 11am and 3pm, especially if you are very fair skinned. Just 10 minutes of strong sunshine is all it takes to burn pale skin.
Slide on your shades - Make sure you wear UV protective sunglasses
*Information supplied from www.britishskinfoundation.org.uk

Saturday, 28 April 2018

Friends and Family

It really does pay to take care of your health. We love seeing results with all of our patients and we feel that you should be rewarded for helping us to help your friends and family. So, for a limited time we are offering a £10 new client referral programme. 
It's so simple, when you attend our practice, simply ask at reception for a'Patient Referral Card' we will complete this card with your details.
You then need to give this to a friend or family member who hasn't previously attended the practice. Upon presentation of the 'Patient Referral Card' at their next appointment they will receive a £10 discount from their consultation fee, and you, as the referrer, will also receive a £10 credit to your account. T&C’s apply
The credits can be used for any service that we provide.
Osteopathy – Massage – Reflexology – Podiatry  Homeopathy - Hypnotherapy – Counselling Acupuncture –Reiki

For more details give us a call 01270 629933 or ask at reception. We'll be happy to help.